Featherbow

>>> Featherbow

featherbow\_mounted.jpg

I’ve seen devices to accomplish the same task made out of various scrap lumber and the like, but this "designed for the purpose" tool seems a pretty decent setup. Definitely better than loosing a finger to a table saw.

NOTE: As I understand it, you do NOT use the "feather" side of the tool against the wood. Watch the available videos for more info.

There is also a Featherbow Junior version available.

Build your own shop tools

>>> Build your own shop tools

Fine Woodworking magazine has published various plans over the years for building some of your own shop tools. If you are interested in boatbuilding, you probably are interested in tools. If you are building a boat, you wish you had more tools than you do. Some of these are right down the alley for me.

A bandsaw, crosscut saw, thickness sander, etc. are all available as downloadable PDF’s for the cost of a subscription (or sign up for the free 15 day trial I guess).

Highland Woodworking – a Highland Hardware company

>>> Highland Woodworking – a Highland Hardware company

If you are into boating and boat building, you probably have a great appreciation for fine woodworking. So many boats have incredible yacht finishes with displays of wood craftsmanship that I know I’ll never match. Even steel boat builders usually have wooden interiors and trim.

Highland Hardware is a longtime Atlanta, GA (USA) hardware store that has specialized in fine woodworking tools and woodworking training and demos. I wondered by there this afternoon to drool. A really neat place to wonder around, if you’re ever in the area. If not, they have an extensive web site and online business.

Check out their blog… its an interesting and fun read also.

Scary Sharp

A lot of boatbuilding seems to revolve around woodworking. Even if you’re inclined to a steel hull, most of the interior will still be wood. There are all kinds of resources for woodworking knowledge, both on the net and elsewhere. Despite being somewhat familiar with this field, I had never ran across the "Scary Sharp" method of tool sharpening. I guess since I tend more toward rough and read wood butchery instead of fine joinery, the fine arts of tool sharpening have passed me by.

Anyway, check it out… its a method of sharpening using sandpaper instead of the more common stones, etc.

Thanks to Dave’s blog (mentioned elsewhere) for this pointer!