25-56 November 2017:

Ahoy everyone!

I hope that everybody had a great Thanksgiving holiday! We were traveling for ours; which to be honest I never like to do. Yet everyone seemed to have a good time so that is what is important.

In the Yard, it was time to get those rafters installed and trim the cabin posts. So on Saturday, my best friend Tony came out to give me a hand aligning, cutting, screwing and gluing the rafters. We started by figuring out the center of each rafter as well as just how much to trim from each side so that the apex of the curve remained centerline. That took a lot of measure, cut, fit, re-measure, recut and refit. However it worked out rather well as we were able to get each and every unique spot on the cabin requiring a rafter fitted. After the myriad of cutting and fitting, it was time to mix up some epoxy and permanently attach these things. It worked out real well save one amidships on the port side. While screwing it, the front part of the bracket split. Requiring a repair of copious amounts of epoxy.

The next day it was just me on my lonesome for the most part as I scaled the side of the boat via ladder to cut all the cabin posts to their required height and shape. I figured I would start with those that actually had rafters and brackets on them. I think could use a batten (a shipwrights mainstay) and trace the outline of the roof curvature on the empty studs. This worked out brilliantly albeit extremely laborious and time consuming. The forward part of the cabin that actually juts out and holds the front door gave me a quandary. I ultimately decided since I had a spare rafter that I would cut a piece out of the middles at the correct size. I figured this out by measuring the overall distance of the rafter and dividing it by two; giving me a mid-point. I than went over to the posts between the door that were affixed to Frame C and measured the distance at between them at the frame. I than divided that measurement by two and on the rafter measured that half measurement from my mid-point mark port and starboard. It was cut and fit and checked to ensure that its roof curvature matched up with the one directly behind it. It did so we glued and screwed it into position. I had my wife come help me while we were fitting so one could hold while the other used levels, or clamps to ensure a correct fit.

Next up on the list is to figure out how to connect that forward door frame to the rest of the cabin studs. Once that is done (which I am sure will prove difficult), I will begin the process of laying the cabin roof. Although I may do the exterior walls first, I have not yet fully committed to either.

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