Head walls

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Didn’t work too awful long, but got the forward head wall pieces cut and put in place. Curve against the cabin/hull side was a little tricky, but came out ok.

Time = 1 hour

Leak Stop – partly

Got some rain yesterday and was able to check on my leak work. Side decks are MUCH better… barely any sign of water from them (one or two small places I need to address).

Still some water in the boat that I think is a seam on the front deck. Will test more there.

In the beginning

Just like Noah I had a sudden urge to buy a houseboat. The Noah reference will become obvious later. Well the urge was actually inspired by an ad in the local paper for a houseboat for sale for only $9000. 20 metres by 6 metres well equipped. There had to be a catch but I just had to check this out. The sale process was a "dutch auction" where the seller seeks increasing offers until they reach an acceptable amount and then agrees to sell. A phone call and an inspection revealed why the price was so low.

PROBLEM No 1.

Heard of the droughts affecting Australia? A consequence of the drought is that the Murray Darling river system is in a state of extreme stress. Water levels have dropped 2 metres. This boat had not been moved from its mooring in a marina in time to escape the water level drop. It is sitting on the bottom and it is possible to walk around the boat on dry ground. A bit off putting as no-one knows if or when the water will return.

PROBLEM 2.

Some obvious wood-rot on the hull. roof, some of the frame. Much worse than the owner was letting on. My estimate was that about 10% of the boats plywood sheeting needed replacing along with a few minor sections of the framework.

GOOD STUFF!

Indeed the boat was well equipped. The cabin interior was well fitted out and in very goog condition. 3 bedrooms, 1 with ensuite, a great galley, a main bathroom, all rooms furnished, All plumbed and wired as new, a great forward wheelhouse, a Ford 4 cyl diesel marine inboard only 400 hrs on the clock, stern drive, hydraulic steering.

THE OFFER.

I threw caution to the wind and offered $11,000.
My offer was noted and things went quiet. A couple of months later I got acall to see if I was still interested. There had been bigger offers but n one had materialised. What was my offer now? I stuck to my original offer of $11,000 More silence for a few weeks and then the owner rings and says he will accept my offer.

THE ADVENTURE BEGINS

The transaction completed, my, actually "our" (I have wife – Patricia, a trusting soul), the adventure begins.

Pics and lockers

Didn’t work a real long time today, but did some sanding and put a coat of bedliner material on the floor of the aft cockpit lockers. That will give a bit more water protection, and help keep stuff from sliding around in there.

Here’s some pictures of the work yesterday:

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The aft sponson covers hinged (and with a first coat of paint):

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Closeup of the lid stop:

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What your mother always told you

Painted until dark tonight, so I’ll have to get some pictures tomorrow.

Started off getting the hinges on the other sponson hatch (including killing the really nasty spider which had taken up residence under the hatch cover). Constructed some brass rod "keepers" to keep the hatches from flopping too far open. Worked like a champ.

Mounted the last of the cleats, did a little epoxy crack filling/sealing and then later in the day painted. Dane sanded a good bit and I painted. Another good coat on the cabin sidewalls, including the trim pieces and actually cutting the line at the side deck and the roof trim. It really looks much better with the paint "right".

Painted the front roof overhang (underneath it) and the "eyebrow" pieces over the front windows. Moved to the rear deck and painted the sponson hatch covers, the rear cabin wall and the rear cockpit lockers.

Most all the unpainted areas (on the exterior, anyhow) now have at least one coat of paint. At least some of the paint got on the boat (I think a good bit was on me).

Oh, that thing your mother always told you? Mine always told me to cover the paint can with a rag when you are putting the lid back on to keep the paint from flying out. Well, its important even when you’re out in the middle of the back yard. I skipped the rag and stomped the lid. And sprayed light blue paint onto the maroon hatch cover I had just painted.

Money = $40.88 (paint and hardware) + $2.86 (tax) = $43.74

Time = 4 hours

S.V. M.O.M.

>>> S.V. M.O.M.

Carl and Kate Anderson have been building a Brent Swain Origami sail boat for a while. Originally named Moonflower of Moab, they have renamed the craft.

Lots of pictures and details, and of interest is a new Powerpoint/Photo CD they have for sale, covering the entire hull construction in detail.

We have a Photo CD containing over 1900 photos of the hull construction process for sale. We have just added a second CD containing 3 Power Point presentations about the construction & rigging of our mast. This CD also contains the free Power Point viewer program so all can view the presentations.

No news

Well, just a quick follow-up on my leak testing… it didn’t rain 🙂

We figure that the drought will return if I get the boat water tight. It didn’t rain for a couple of years, a lot of that while the boat was either covered or upside down and it didn’t really matter. When I got it upright it started raining and we’ve caught up one of the worst droughts in many years.

I considered renting out the hull to people to put in their yards for a while. It would rain on the boat when all around was still dry.

Sponson cover hinges

Had a minute to talk over my hinge issues with my friend Roger. As with many things, a fresh set of (skilled) eyes, and its an obvious “why in the world didn’t I think of that”… of maybe “duh”.

Anyway, got a couple of “T” hinges, mounted on the rear of the pod/sponson areas with the strap up and bent over the top lip under the lid. Screwed down and seems like it will work well.

I got one of them mounted, but need a little adjustment to make the lid not hit (of course the first time I screwed the lid on I went to the “outside” of my mark instead of the “inside” and wound up with the lid hanging off the side of the boat a couple of inches.

Supposed to rain tonight, so we’ll see how the leaks go.

Time = 15 minutes