OK, I know we’ve said it before, but… Here are the hard requirements:

Trailerable – Max beam 8′ 6″. Somewhere around 30′ or just a bit less.

This rules out the Bateau.com Trawler 28 (beam 10′) and Puffin 28 (beam 9′ 6″).

Outboard or electric powered – Not a big engine/go fast boat. Fuel efficiency is quite important. I’m leaning away from the complexity of in inboard diesel with the required cooling and other support systems.

This rules out the Bateau.com’s Downeast 25 and Devlin’s Surf Scooter.

Head w/shower – nothing else to say there.

Coastal capable – Not ocean going but more than a mill pond. Something that could do the Great Loop and various U.S. rivers. Shallow draft.

The ability to fit in a container to go “over the pond” and do the canals in Europe would be nice. I think anything trailerable in this size range would make that, unless height was an issue.

Here’s the short list:

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Mark Van Abbema’s V28


LOA 28′ 0″
Beam 7′ 6″ Draft 14″
Disp 4,000 lb
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Pros:

  • Easiest to build
  • Designed to be trailerable
  • Outboard Powered
  • Lots of room for solar cells
  • Plans \$105

Cons:

  • Cabin space limited

Thoughts:

  • Could extend roofline over rear cockpit
    • Have rolldown cover for more “inside” space?
  • Would it tolerate a forward, small cabin?
  • Designed for plywood/epoxy/screw and glue construction

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Chesapeake Marine Design Trailer Trawler 28

Length 28′-0″
Beam 8′-6″
Draft 2′-6″
Weight 11,000 lbs
Power 40 hp

Pros:

  • Designed to be trailerable
  • Interior space
  • Nice looking

Cons:

  • Designed for inboard diesel – power would be borderline for electric
  • Plans $380

Thoughts:

  • Closest in looks to a C-Ranger Tug or similar
  • Designed for plywood/epoxy stitch and glue (mostly), fiberglass or aluminum

Devlin Czarinna 30′

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Length 29’10”
LWL 25’3″
Beam 8′-6″
Draft 2′-4″
Disp. 8900 lbs
Power twin 18 hp

Pros:

  • Great looks
  • Fantail stern
  • Interior space
  • Designed around twin, low HP engines… I think retrofitting with twin electric pods would work well

Cons:

  • Hardest to build with the fantail stern
  • Fantail stern (a bit less usable space onboard)
  • Plans $325

Thoughts:

  • A “real ship”
  • Stitch and glue – Devlin specializes in stitch and glue on larger boats

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Bluejacket Boats – especially the 25.5

This is a new version added since my previous writeup…

Mr. Lathrop had a list of design goals:

  • Light enough and small enough to be easily trailerable with a family vehicle.
  • Capable of economic cruising at 12 to 14 mph with a top speed of at least 50% higher.
  • Seaworthy in coastal and inshore waters.
  • Economical in and out of the water.
  • Sitting headroom over the berths in the sleeping cabin and standing headroom in the pilothouse.
  • Classic lines.
  • Comfortable for cruising with a crew of two for a week or more.
  • A private head with standing headroom.

  Length over all = 25 feet 9 inches = 309 inches including stem
Length of hull = 25 feet 6 inches = 306 inches
Beam = 96 inches (hull), 98 inches (incl. rubrails)
Beam, waterline (max) = 78 inches (hull), 80 inches ( incl. splashrail)
Beam, waterline (transom) = 70 inches (hull), 72 inches (incl. splashrail)
Headroom (over bunks) = 36 inches
Headroom (forecabin) = 52 1/2 inches
Headroom (pilothouse) = 76 inches
Weight, dry w/o engine = 2000 lb
Displacement, cruising w/engine, fuel, water, 2 crew & stores = 2550lbs to 3000 lbs Positive floatation = >1600 lb (foam)
Power = 60hp to 70hp outboard
Freeboard, forward = 48 inches
Freeboard, aft = 34 inches
Speed, max = 24mph (60hp)
Speed, cruising = 11 to 18 mph

Pros:

  • Faster
  • Easier to build
  • Newer design has adequate interior space (barely)

Cons:

  • Designed for more power – this is going to be outboard and not electric
  • Fantail stern (a bit less usable space onboard)
  • Plans $175

Thoughts:

  • Very close to a C-Dory
  • Stitch and glue
  • I’ve corresponded with others who decided on this design

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Bateau.com – MT24 – Maia 24

Length 23’7″
LWL 19’8″
Beam 8′-6″
Draft 1’11”
Disp. 4,2100 lbs
Power 10-25 hp

Pros:

  • Nice hull form
  • Low power – electric feasible

Cons:

  • Smallest
  • Less published about this one
  • Plans $200

Thoughts:

  • Cute little boat
  • Small but displacement speed only
  • Stitch and glue