HurriQuake

>>> HurriQuake

A new breed of nail… stronger, tighter holding, able to leap tall buildings with a single bound, etc.

Why on a boatbuilding site? Well, I thought there could be some interesting trends in fasteners… people use ring nails that sound a little similar, and lots of screws. Maybe these or some other type of nail might be useful in your boat building endeavors.

If nothing else, many of us have docks or structures near the shore where this technology may be of use.

On-board medicine

Here’s a topic that has suddenly become more near and dear to my heart… or at least my kidney.

I’m fighting a kidney stone… first time I’ve had one, and it is NOT pleasant. Still have some procedures to undergo to try to rid myself of it.

What would happen if I was out cruising? For this, I would probably have enough warning to get near shore and at least call for help. For coastal cruisers, you are often near assistance. The flip side is that it can take a while to get to that assistance, even though you are near shore. Check this commentin a thread we’ve referred to… makes you think (it discusses the time involved in getting someone to a dock and hospital even when in a canal and close to shore).

Anyway, what medicines and medical emergencies do you think you need to be equipped to cover? I’ll try to expand on this over time and make it another resource.

  • Basic first aid type
  • Advanced lifesaving (if you are trained in its use)
  • Defibrillator
  • etc.

You have basic accidents and injuries (falls, cuts, broken bones, etc.). You have illnesses, major and minor. Then you have sudden onset emergencies such as heart attacks and asthma attacks that can call for life saving measures in minutes, not hours.

All things to think about.

Send me your comments and share experiences.

U.K. Canal Protests

It looks like there are some protests that have been happening in the UK concerning the possibilities of job cuts in the British Waterways staff. The protests seem to involve the group of "Save our Waterways" using their boats to blockade canals.

I guess when the canal is only 7′ wide, its not hard to block 🙂

I hope things get worked out soon and allow the free flow of traffic and the support of the canal workers and infrastructure that is needed to keep this great national (and international) resource alive and well.

BBC article.

Seamanship Software

There has been a recent discussion on the Great Loop list concerning Seamanship software… otherwise described as a flight simulator for your boat. This is an idea I have thought about, especially for training and "dusting off" some skills after a time away from your boat. Or maybe when moving from one craft to another.

Despite some posters feeling that there are too many variables to make it realistic, I don’t know that I agree. It might be cost prohibitive, but I can’t really believe that its that much more complex than flight simulators. Now the dynamics of individual craft, yeah, that gets pretty "fine toothed", but for general theory and practice, I’m sure its doable.

Anyway, a couple of links were posted… haven’t gotten to try them yet, but plan to:

  • http://www.boatmaster.org/ – free limited time trial available

  • Ship Simulator – by VStep ($25-30) – Not perfect but the closest I’ve found. You can even drive the Titanic (pre-iceberg!). Half a dozen different ship sizes from tugboats to the big ones. Needs 1.6 Gigs CPU speed (preferable 2.0). – Jim

Happy Thanksgiving

… and where am I?

Wanted to wish any readers a Happy Thanksgiving (if you’re in the U.S., anyhow), and to tell you that posts may be a bit thin for a few days. Among other hats, I am the volunteer head of lighting for my church (Jonesboro First Baptist, Jonesboro, GA). We’re setting up and will be running the performances for our Living Christmas Tree… obviously this takes a bunch of my time, so I won’t be on quite as much as normal.

Back soon!

Happy Thanksgiving

… and where am I?

Wanted to wish any readers a Happy Thanksgiving (if you’re in the U.S., anyhow), and to tell you that posts may be a bit thin for a few days. Among other hats, I am the volunteer head of lighting for my church (Jonesboro First Baptist, Jonesboro, GA). We’re setting up and will be running the performances for our Living Christmas Tree… obviously this takes a bunch of my time, so I won’t be on quite as much as normal.

Back soon!

Ships and Science

Ships and Science: The Birth of Naval Architecture in the Scientific Revolution, 1600-1800 (Transformations: Studies in the History of Science and Technology)

An automated recommendation from Amazon that looks pretty interesting… might be worth checking out.


Book Description (from Amazon)
"Naval architecture was born in the mountains of Peru, in the mind of a French astronomer named Pierre Bouguer who never built a ship in his life." So writes Larrie Ferreiro at the beginning of this pioneering work on the science of naval architecture. Bouguer’s monumental book Traité du navire (Treatise of the Ship) founded a discipline that defined not the rules for building a ship but the theories and tools to predict a ship’s characteristics and performance before it was built. In Ships and Science, Ferreiro argues that the birth of naval architecture formed an integral part of the Scientific Revolution. Using Bouguer’s work as a cornerstone, Ferreiro traces the intriguing and often unexpected development of this new discipline and describes its practical application to ship design in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Drawing on previously untapped primary-source and archival information, he places the development of naval architecture in the contexts of science, navy, and society, across the major shipbuilding nations of Britain, France, Spain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Denmark, and Italy.

Ferreiro describes the formulation of the three major elements of ship theory (the science of explaining the physical behavior of a ship): maneuvering and sail theory, ship resistance and hydrodynamics, and stability theory. He considers the era’s influential books on naval architecture and describes the professionalization of ship constructors that is the true legacy of this period. Finally, looking from the viewpoints of both the constructor and the naval administrator, he explains why the development of ship theory was encouraged, financed, and used in naval shipbuilding. A generous selection of rarely seen archival images accompanies the text.

[amazon]

The New Boatbuilder’s Home Page – Ike’s List

>>> The New Boatbuilder’s Home Page – Ike’s List

A list of links that has a valuable collection of ‘builder’ oriented links, along with miscellaneous boat links. I first found the site when I discovered people coming here to Craft A Craft from his list of links… thanks for the link, Ike 🙂

Areas include:

Regulations, Standards, Etc.
Backyard Boatbuilders
Boat Building Related Sites
Boat Building and Design Schools
Books Of Interest To Boat Builders
Marine Surveyors and sites of interest to marine surveyors
Antique and Classic Boats Boating and Boatbuilding Forums I find of interest More Forums……. More Misc Links
Boat and Boat Related Recalls
Carbon Monoxide Related Problems
Boat Building Associations and Societies
Electrical Systems
Fuel System Sites
Magazines
Boat Performance Calculators Atomic 4 Engine Web Sites Boating Safety Web Sites Boating Industry News Sites
Boating Related Companies that sell stuff for boats
More Misc Links

Other areas on the web site include:

NEWS! Ike’s  List Ask Ike Home Chart Page About This Site Contact Me       
Boat Business Hull ID Numbers Labeling Safe Horsepower Safe Loading Flotation Fuel Systems Marine Toilets
Legal Stuff Electrical Ventilation Recalls Fed Regs Boating Quotes Nav Lights